A Survey of Barclay Cove

A Survey of Barclay Cove

Barclay Cove Tour 7 9 14

 

 

 

 

 

DATA FOR BARCLAY COVE

DATED: 7 9 14

TIME: 3-5PM

WEATHER: BREEZY COOL SOME CLOUDS

PREVIOUS DAYS WEATHER: HEAVY RAINS IN PAST THREE DAYS

WATER CONDITIONS: DEGREE OF TURBIDITY

LOCATION: VILLAGE OF SAUGERTIES OPPOSITE PUBLIC BOAT RAMP & BEACH

DISSOLVED OXYGEN CONCENTRATION UNITS: Milligrams per Litre: mg/l (ppm)

range 0-15mg/l

% DISSOLVED OXYGEN: % SATURATION

DEPTH OF WATER: METERS AND CM

DEPTH OF MEASUREMENT TAKEN: HALF WAY IN WATER COLUMN

GPS: Accuracy to within 5 meters, UTM units

PLANTS:

WATER CHESTNUT: Trapa natans

SPADDERDOCK (Yellow Pond Lily or Cow Lily): Nuphar polysepala

Spatterdock is also a valuable plant for fish and wildlife habitat. Its large leaves provide shade, cover from predators, and a home for many tiny invertebrates which fish use for food.

 

SITES TIMES DO %Saturation DEPTH GPS UTM DESCRIPTION

#1 3:30 pm 85% +/- 6’? None Taken Entrance to OPEN CHANNEL
#2 3:35 pm 85% +/-6’? None Taken 2nd site of Entrance to OPEN CHANNEL
#3 3:50 pm 2.5 mg/l 30% 1.2 m 05867964657927 Middle of WATER CHESTNUT bed
#4 3:55 pm 8.6 mg/l 110% 1.5 m 05867804657945 Middle of OPEN CHANNEL
#5 4:00 pm 10.7 mg/l 130% 60 cm 05867554657972 Middle of Spatterdock bed

 

** http://www.waterontheweb.org/under/waterquality/oxygen.html

http://www.ecy.wa.gov/programs/wq/plants/management/joysmanual/streamdo.html

http://www.ecy.wa.gov/programs/wq/plants/management/joysmanual/streamdo.html

Like terrestrial animals, fish and other aquatic organisms need oxygen to live. As water moves past their gills (or other breathing apparatus), microscopic bubbles of oxygen gas in the water, called dissolved oxygen (DO), are transferred from the water to their blood. Like any other gas diffusion process, the transfer is efficient only above certain concentrations. In other words, oxygen can be present in the water, but at too low a concentration to sustain aquatic life. Oxygen also is needed by virtually all algae and all macrophytes, and for many chemical reactions that are important to lake functioning.

The clouds reduce daytime photosynthesis with its oxygen production and so the DO in the mixed layer. Or even throughout the water column of a shallow unstratified lake, can become critical for fish and other aquatic organisms.

Yellow pond or Cow lily

http://www.ecy.wa.gov/programs/wq/plants/native/nuphar.html

Dept of Ecology State of Washington

Spatterdock – A Plant With Many Uses

Spatterdock, a useful native plant, is a rooted, floating-leaved plant with bright yellow flowers commonly seen in Washington lakes and ponds. Its scientific name is Nuphar polysepala, and it is also commonly called the yellow pond or cow lily. Spatterdock can sometimes be confused with the fragrant water lily (Nymphaea odorata), a similar looking exotic plant that has been introduced in many Washington lakes. However, if they are blooming they can be easily distinguished, for the fragrant water lily has showy white or sometimes pink many-petaled flowers.

Spatterdock is also a valuable plant for fish and wildlife habitat. Its large leaves provide shade, cover from predators, and a home for many tiny invertebrates which fish use for food. The seeds are eaten by ducks and other birds, and muskrat, beaver, and nutria will eat the roots. Deer have also been known to browse the flowers and leaves. When spatterdock is accompanied  by other native aquatic plants, it is very beneficial to wildlife habitat and an important part of a lake ecosystem.

 

http://www.dnr.state.md.us/bay/sav/water_chestnut.asp

Water chestnut (Trapa natans) is an aquatic plant native to Asia. Introduced to North America near Concord, Massachusetts in 1859, water chestnut became established in locations throughout the northeast.

This aggressive species is a prolific reproducer. One acre of water chestnut can produce enough seeds to cover 100 acres the following year. With four, hard half-inch long spines that are sharp enough to penetrate shoe soles and large enough to keep people off beaches, these seeds are major hazards to water recreation.

Water chestnut provides poor habitat to native fish and birds.

 

The Bird River (Maryland) water chestnut population spread from approximately 50 plants in summer 1997 to over three acres in 1998, and approximately 30 acres in 1999. A massive mechanical and volunteer harvesting effort began on both rivers in 1999, resulting in the removal of approximately 400,000 pounds of plants from the two rivers. In light of the potentially massive problems posed by water chestnut, the Maryland Department of Natural Resources (DNR) continued mechanical and hand removal efforts. Less than 1000 pounds of plants were discovered and removed from both rivers in 2000, indicating that the 1999 removal efforts were successful in reducing the total number of plants. In 2001, a large volunteer force was used instead of the mechanical harvesters, which was a significant milestone for the overall eradication effort.